For many of us Sunday 4th February 2018 will be a significant day as this is the date that the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) has set as World Cancer Day. This date is to raise awareness for a disease that has affected most of us, whether directly or someone we know.

Thankfully there are some cancers that with early diagnosis have a good cure rate such as skin cancer. Whilst many of us will tend to believe that there is a stereotype to catch skin cancer such as pale skin, freckles and those with moles, this often isn’t the case. Anyone who exposes his or her skin to the sun carries a risk of catching ‘non melanoma’ skin cancer. This cancer is different from ‘melanoma’ skin cancer, often the result of ultraviolet radiation and people with predispositions like skin type [people with freckles, pale skin], excessive sun exposure , Sun beds.

Basal Cell Carcinoma [BCC] also called ‘Rodent Ulcer’ and Squamous Cell Carcinoma [SCC] cancer make up the 2 different types of non-melanoma skin cancers. Both develop on areas of the skin exposed to the sun, such as face, head, neck and ears. Basal cell skin cancer is found on the deep layer of the epidermis and tends not to spread, whilst squamous cell skin cancer can spread causing secondary cancers.

With early detection, [like good examination, using a special light called Dermoscope, biopsy of the lesion can give accurate diagnosis and so an early intervention and cure. so it’s imperative you should see a doctor or dermatologist if you have any of the following symptoms.

• A spot or sore that doesn’t heal within 4 weeks and that may be itchy, crusty or bleeds.
• A small growing lump that appears shiny, pink or red.
• An ulcer, which is an area of broken skin that again doesn’t heal within a few weeks.
• Any itchy red patches.
• It is possible for basal cell carcinoma to develop where burns, scars or ulcers have damaged the skin

 

Find out more about our mole checks visit www.prem-aesthetics.co.uk/mole-checks-and-removal/

For more information on skin cancer visit www.cancerresearchuk.org